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Hatchlings

 

Hatchlings is our blog dedicated to inspirational client stories and big ideas in ministry innovation. From astrophysics to farming to the church down the street, we believe that God-breathed, wild ideas can come from anywhere. 

Hare Brain & Tortoise Mind

Hare Brain & Tortoise Mind

Cleese argues that innovation and creativity doesn’t come from just tortoise mind or hare-brained thinking but the rhythm of back and forth between the two. We focus on writing, or math, or problem-solving until we feel our brains tire, and then we stop. We go outside, we play a game, we do household chores, we exercise, we rest, and let the other levels of our brain work on the project.
When we return to the hare brain work, we will find it easier but more fun, life-giving, and productive.

Innovation Should be Fun

Innovation Should be Fun

Where in your world could you embrace a bit more of the fun? The work of innovation you are doing has the chance truly fun, but we sometimes miss it by taking ourselves a bit too seriously. Where could you recognize the playfulness inherent in your work and allow yourself to truly become immersed in it?

Funerals, Potlucks, and the Ripple Effect

Funerals, Potlucks, and the Ripple Effect

We can sometimes get so caught up in the minutia of our problems that we miss their interconnected nature. Because we miss how the problems are interconnected, we deprive ourselves of the hope that comes with the reality that their solutions might be as well.

Invited into the Story

Invited into the Story

The idea of the lone founder is a myth. Nothing we create we create on our own. It can be easy to love our dreams and ideas so deeply, and to be so afraid of their rejection, that we cling them too tightly to our chests to let anyone else in. But for those ideas, those dreams, to grow from hopes into programs and places and people transformed, we have to be willing to invite other people into the story. 

How to Spend 100 Million Dollars

How to Spend 100 Million Dollars

Churches tend to think of money in two ways: they either gather, save, and grow it to keep the lights on, or they give it away to help people. Elsdon argues that the church can do both and find new and invigorating purpose along the way.

Who & Why, not What & How

Who & Why, not What & How

Ryan and Tami knew the community they wanted to serve (their neighbors who were disenfranchised from the church, particularly due to addiction). They knew the mission they were trying to achieve (a community, free of shame, where people could know they were loved exactly where they were on their journey). Ryan and Tami had their who and why, but the how and the what constantly evolved.